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What’s mine is ours: how consumption is changing

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Technology hasn’t just changed the way consumers use goods and services, it’s also changed the way they own them. Music collections, for example, have evolved from hundreds of alphabetically-organized records on a shelf, to carefully edited digital libraries, to the 2021 version — a list of songs stored on Spotify or some other streaming platform. What consumers used to think of as “mine” is now “ours” in the sharing economy, where everything from car rides to books has become less of a coveted item and more of an experience.

But marketers know that there is value in psychological ownership. When customers form an emotional attachment or self-identify with a product, that sense of “mine” enhances its luster and keeps them coming back for more. As shoppers shift away from owning material things, how can marketers preserve these benefits? Some answers can be found in a new study, “Evolution of Consumption: A Psychological Ownership Framework,” which recently appeared in the Journal of Marketing.

Wharton marketing professor Deborah Small and Carey Morewedge, a marketing professor at Boston University’s Questrom School of Business, are two of the paper’s authors. They joined Knowledge@Wharton (podcast + transcript) to talk about changes in consumption and offered some strategies for marketers.

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[Book] A City Is Not a Computer

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A City Is Not a Computer: Other Urban Intelligences
Shannon Mattern
Princeton University Press, August 2021
200 pages

A bold reassessment of “smart cities” that reveals what is lost when we conceive of our urban spaces as computers

Computational models of urbanism—smart cities that use data-driven planning and algorithmic administration—promise to deliver new urban efficiencies and conveniences. Yet these models limit our understanding of what we can know about a city. A City Is Not a Computer reveals how cities encompass myriad forms of local and indigenous intelligences and knowledge institutions, arguing that these resources are a vital supplement and corrective to increasingly prevalent algorithmic models.

Shannon Mattern begins by examining the ethical and ontological implications of urban technologies and computational models, discussing how they shape and in many cases profoundly limit our engagement with cities. She looks at the methods and underlying assumptions of data-driven urbanism, and demonstrates how the “city-as-computer” metaphor, which undergirds much of today’s urban policy and design, reduces place-based knowledge to information processing. Mattern then imagines how we might sustain institutions and infrastructures that constitute more diverse, open, inclusive urban forms. She shows how the public library functions as a steward of urban intelligence, and describes the scales of upkeep needed to sustain a city’s many moving parts, from spinning hard drives to bridge repairs.

Incorporating insights from urban studies, data science, and media and information studies, A City Is Not a Computer offers a visionary new approach to urban planning and design.

> Article in Places Magazine

Shannon Mattern is a columnist for Places. She is a professor of anthropology at The New School in New York City. Mattern’s research and teaching address how the forms and materialities of media are related to the spaces (architectural, urban, and conceptual) they create and inhabit. Her writing and teaching focus on archives, libraries, and other media spaces; media infrastructures; spatial epistemologies; and mediated sensation and exhibition. I’m the author of three books: The New Downtown Library: Designing with CommunitiesDeep Mapping the Media City; and Code and Clay, Dirt and Data: 5000 Years of Urban Media, all published by University of Minnesota Press.

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Case Studies

Crypto Sentiment Advisor

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The Crypto Sentiment Advisor (CSA) is an EIT-Digital supported platform for investors holding cryptocurrencies, to anticipate swings in the sentiment for their investments and help them mitigate risks associated with cryptocurrency.

By leveraging big data, machine learning and currency trading algorithms, CSA derives trading signals from divers information sources, so crypto investors can adjust their risk management before big price fluctuations occur.

With CSA more risk-averse investors will be able to participate in the cryptocurrency market. This encourages the use and establishment of cryptocurrency as an alternative asset class in the long term.

Experientia is in charge of the UX research that will inform the

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Why insurers need to care more about customers and how to do it in the digital age

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COVID-19 has changed the way we live and shop, write in another article by the Swiss Re Institute.

Amid the turmoil coronavirus has created, consumers are looking for information and clarity from the companies they frequent on how to best protect themselves and how to protect others. Insurers have failed to meet this demand. Most consumers have not heard from their insurance companies so far during the pandemic. The majority of those who did hear from their life, property or health insurance provider only received a mass communication.

The digital transformation offers insurers more opportunities to interact with

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Swiss Re Institute on how COVID-19 is transforming consumer behaviour

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The COVID-19 pandemic is changing how we work, travel, communicate, shop and more, but which new habits are likely to stick permanently? Mahesh H Puttaiah, Aakash Kiran Raverkar and Evangelos Avramakis of Swiss Re Institute explore five key behavioural changes and their implications for risk and protection.

The authors of this long article (more of a paper, with great dynamic visuals) see five key trends in the behavioural changes emerging from the impact of COVID-19:

Increased digital adoption: people shifting to digital platforms for day-to-day needs.Change in mobility patterns: less use of public transport, more remote working etc.Change in purchasing behaviour: move

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Online exhibition: Design in an Age of Crisis

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The Design In An Age Of Crisis Gallery features submissions to a global open call issued in 2020 by Chatham House and London Design Biennale, inviting radical design thinking from the world’s design community, the public and young people.

World crises which the current Covid-19 pandemic has either shone a light on or further exacerbated are addressed with entries from across the world. These include: the poor health and unhealthy living situations of millions of people; the climate emergency; the deeply embedded social and economic inequalities in our societies; and the rapid transformations in work and the economy which

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The Scottish Approach to Service Design (SAtSD)

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The vision for the Scottish Approach to Service Design is that the people of Scotland are supported and empowered to actively participate in the definition, design and delivery of their public services (from policy making to live service improvement).

This is a framework to guide how we design user-centred public services and not an attempt to create a template/toolkit for designing any service. It’s about how we all agree on and support the set of core ideas and intentions we need to build into our organisations to ensure we design the right thing, before designing the thing right.

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[Book] How design makes the world

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How design makes the world
Scott Berkun
Self published
May 2020, 210 pages

“Everything you use, from your home to your smartphone, from highways to supermarkets, was designed by someone. What did they get right? Where did they go wrong? And what can we learn from how these experts think that can help us improve our own lives?

In How Design Makes The World, bestselling author and designer Scott Berkun reveals how designers, from software engineers to city planners, have succeeded and failed us. From the airplane armrest to the Facebook “like” button, and everything in between, Berkun shows how design helps or

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Berlin exhibition features Experientia work

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Exhibition: HUMAN SCALE REMEASURED
New spatial requirements, societal demands and economic values in architecture
16 January – 13 May 2021 (for now visits by appointment only)
Opening: Thursday, 4 February 2021, 6.30pm
Aedes Architecture Forum, Christinenstr. 18-19, 10119 Berlin

The exhibition, curated by ANCB The Aedes Metropolitan Laboratory, presents exemplary built projects and outstanding conceptual models by architects and planners from all over the world. These proposals are the results of a new way of thinking in which cities, built living spaces and working environments are not only designed and realised in an ecologically sustainable way, but also implemented with the objective of

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Videos online of the SDGC conference 2020

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All videos of the Service Design Global Conference of October 2020 [#SDGC20] are now available for free on youtube. Here the links to the keynotes and the talks (and links to slide decks when available).

Keynotes

Decolonising Design: Six Respectful Steps for Embracing Change [1:01;03]
Elizabeth Tunstall Canada | Dean, Faculty of Design, OCAD University
In this talk, Elizabeth (Dori) Tunstall describes the ways in which design has been disrespectful to Indigenous, Black, and People of Color communities. Beyond diversity and inclusion, she addresses the necessity to decolonise design (i.e. decouple design from the modernist project in order to support Indigenous