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Checkboxes vs multi-select dropdown — A comparative study

Checkboxes vs multi-select dropdown — A comparative study

While re-looking at a certain journey in the portal I have been working on, I came across a particular screen I invested myself in. This screen was a simple, straight-forward form with a bunch of fields. Sounds pretty basic, right? That’s what I thought too.

Since I was committed to doing a thorough analysis, I put every little detail through a fine-toothed comb and discovered one form field that I believe needed a look over — the checkboxes.

The article ahead is a case study where I will –
 — outline the use case
 — analyse the current design
 — research to come up

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Mobile

The Myths of Mobile Design and Why They Matter

When it comes to any school of thought surrounding a new concept – there comes a point when there is a body of “accepted knowledge”. That body of knowledge then becomes sacrosanct and instead of being treated as a guide to inform our work – it becomes practical dogma. It is worth challenging such myths and seeking to explore beneath the surface of the dogma to get at the truth beneath; so that we can develop better user experiences even when we fly in the face of “what everybody knows”.Josh Clark, the designer and developer, reported in Forbes and The

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Mobile

A User-Centred Approach to Mobile Design and a 5 Stage Process for You to Use

The mobile web is here to stay. However, it’s important to remember that having a mobile website isn’t the key to success – it’s providing the right approach to the mobile user experience that brings success. Taking a user-centred approach to mobile (and other) design can help you keep in mind the outcomes that you intend rather than wasting time on unrewarding designs. The mobile web is a description intended to distinguish accessing the internet on a tablet or a smartphone as opposed to a regular PC or laptop. As the world has adopted smartphones over the last decade –

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Understand the Social Needs for Accessibility in UX Design

As UX designers, we have a lot on our plates. The term “UX Unicorn” exists for a reason. We are responsible for our clients’ goals as well as our users’ needs. You might ask then, why should you think about Accessibility in your UX Design process? Imagine going into a design workshop and telling your client that you need more hours to make his or her company website accessible. You’ll need a good use case to convince your client and maybe even yourself that accessibility should feature in the UX Design process. Here, we will look at the social need

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The Golden Ratio – Principles of form and layout

Now, we’re going to look at a subject that comes directly from mathematics and that we can also find all around us – the golden ratio. Don’t worry; we’re not going back into the classroom for long. We will examine what this concept is and exactly how much it is a fundamental part of making designs pleasing to the user’s eye. The golden ratio’s story is the stuff of legend. With a history dating back almost to the time of Pi (another great mathematical formula, which is essential in understanding properties of circles), scholars, including Pythagoras and Euclid, have called

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Mobile

Using Mobile Apps – The One Thumb, One Eyeball Test for Good Mobile Design

Mobile designs need to take into account the way that users work with a mobile phone. That means understanding that distractions can come into play when the smartphone is in use and also ensuring that you make the input process as simple as possible to counteract their impact. Luke Wroblewski suggests the “one thumb, one eyeball” test as an efficient way of coming to grips with this problem. It may help make your mobile designs more user friendly and enhance the mobile user experience.Author/Copyright holder: Z22. Copyright terms and licence: CC BY-SA 3.0 Analysing usage patterns for smartphones is a

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UI/UX: Should Designers F***ing Code?

Settling the “great debate” once and for all. Spoiler: it depends on how far you want to go.

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5 Mistakes Junior designers DO

After listening to many podcasts and employers talks, I have an idea of what they’re looking for and what is a turn off, what gives us bonus points, and what will help improve your works. I see a lot of designers wasting precious time and energy instead of investing in a way that will leverage their careers.

And the following mistakes are things I didn’t hear or read, I just noticed and I have to write it down:

© Adam Nizri#Open to work — Yes, that sticker you put on your profile picture in LinkedIn and hoped that now all the cofounders and CEO’s will call you!

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White space design: 20 striking examples and best practices

Learn how white space design can help shape the content on your website and make it stand out with 20 inspiring examples

Could you exist without space? Would any separate entity exist without it? Believe it or not, our bodies are made up of 99.9999999% space. It’s a vital part of life, but in a world full of physical and virtual content, we often forget about the important role of space. In web design, we refer to it as “white space”.

White space, less commonly known as negative space, is crucial to a website’s UI layout. A cluttered UI is the web equivalent

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We’ve open sourced the Merge CLI

The release of the recently announced UXPin Merge introduces a new era for UXPin: we’re not just for designers anymore. Merge allows frontend devs to push live, working React components to UXPin. This ensures designers are prototyping with real, up-to-date components and reduces friction in the design/dev handoff.

How do developers test components locally and push their design system components to UXPin?

The Merge CLI, of course! Today we’re happy to announce that our CLI has been open sourced on GitHub. If you’re a developer using Merge, you’ll get the same open source flow you’ve come to expect: submit issues,

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